nevver:

Couple restores abandoned French Chateau, starts a blog

If you can say Schwarzenegger, you can say Esparza

- Raúl Esparza on idiots who kept pressuring him to change his name to something less latino. (via magnetic-rose)

Our names are not a burden.

(via zombieflorence)

;

shattystrashstache:

real friendship is sending them a link to something terrible so you can both be traumatized at the same time

I keep thinking about this river somewhere, with the water moving really fast. And these two people in the water, trying to hold onto each other, holding on as hard as they can, but in the end it’s just too much. The current’s too strong. They’ve got to let go, drift apart. That’s how it is with us. It’s a shame, Kath, because we’ve loved each other all our lives. But in the end, we can’t stay together forever.
Kazuo Ishiguro, Never Let Me Go (via magiquotes);

isteiro:

Gisele Bündchen at Marni S/S 2001-02

miss-accacia27:

Liza Minnelli, 1969.

Twiggy c. 1966

shinji-moon:

ADVICE FROM DIONYSUS
Shinji Moon 

Burn all your bridges
just so that you can build them again
with thicker ropes. 

Hurt all the people you love
and then commit every felony to win them back. 

Drown yourself in bleach until not even Heaven’s light
can compare to how bright you burn. 

Turn yourself inside out
and paint your organs the color of what you see
in your dreams. 

This is the art of 
living with a ticking heart, a grenade you
throw through windows to make a 
point that language 
has no room for. 

This is how I destroyed you.

And this,
is how I kept you alive. 

Dig yourself a ditch, six
feet deep, and bury everything that you’ve ever
said, everything that you’ve never
meant, and everything that has
burned you and left you with nothing
but ash. 

alexnicole:

Me

Women have always been healers. They were the unlicensed doctors and anatomists. They were abortionists, nurses and counselors. They were the pharmacists, cultivating healing herbs, and exchanging the secrets of their uses. They were midwives, traveling from home to home and village to village. For centuries women were doctors without degrees, barred from books and lectures, learning from each other, and passing on experience from neighbor to neighbor and mother to daughter. They were called “wise women” by the people, witches or charlatans by the authorities. Medicine is part of our heritage as women, our history, our birthright.
Barbara Ehrenreich & Deirdre English, “Witches, Midwives and Nurses: A History of Women Healers” (via ynannarising);
@theme